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I’ve cut out the two rosette sheets I made.  I’m happy to report that this experiment was incredibly informative.  I have a much better Idea of which strokes and shapes are easier to slice.  Some initial conclusions:

  • Cutting with upstrokes (or away from the body) is harder than downstrokes.  The main issue with upstrokes is safety, but I don’t know what portion of my target audience cares much about that.  Suffice it to say that whoever wants can use the left-handed versions if they’re right-handed and vice-versa.
  • The shapes that were more “circular” as opposed to “squarish” were easier to cut.  In retrospect that’s obvious, since they involve more gradual curves.  The squared shapes were clipped from rounded rectangles, going straight for most of the curve but then curving abruptly at the end.  Avoiding abrupt curves is one of the main design features I’m avoiding.  I thought that with more of a “straightaway”, the squared shapes would be easier.  Good thing I tested!

I need to sit down and compile the average easiness of cutting the shapes at different orientations.  As I went, I used the following rather subjective grading system, from low to high: x, ~x, ~, ~v, v (pretend the v is a check mark).  Then it’s off to update the typeface!

I assume the results will be just as relevant for the triangular version of the basic shape.  I’ll test it anyway just to be sure.

For your viewing pleasure:

Downstroke version

Upstroke version

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